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Reporting Child Abuse

As a teacher, you are used to seeing students at school. Your gut tells you when something might be wrong – a student isn’t safe at home or a parent is struggling. Virtual teaching has changed the school environment, but your instincts are still the same.

How To Report Child Abuse

Your gut tells you when something might be wrong – a student isn’t safe at home, or a parent is struggling. Virtual teaching has changed the school environment, but your instincts are still the same. If you’re concerned about possible child abuse and neglect, trust your gut and call child protective services in your area. Dial 9-1-1 if there is an immediate threat.

Am I required to tell my coworkers or supervisor(s) that I reported possible child abuse and neglect?

Depending on the states, most of the State law does not specify that mandatory reporters notify their supervisors before or after making a report. School or district policy may vary.

As a mandatory reporter, can I remain anonymous?

Child protective services and its employees are required by law not to disclose the name of the mandatory reporter to the family. However, this confidentiality does not apply to reports made to law enforcement.

Am I liable if my concerns are not confirmed?

It is better to be safe than sorry – make the call. Based on the information you provide and information other callers may have provided in the past about the same family, a group of professionals review, evaluate, and direct the actions that should be taken to help the family. If your call is screened out, you or the family in need may still be connected with local family support resources.

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